Ban the Box

Directly Impacted Leaders go to Washington to Discuss Ban the Box

12068867_10207804792542764_4179258108567173346_oMembers of the Formerly Incarcerated, Convicted People & Families Movement gathered in Washington, D.C. to review and strategize around Congress’ proposed legislation to “Ban the Box” on federal jobs. FICPFM leaders met with key staffers for the bill sponsors and in the White House, relaying their expertise and analysis on employment discrimination against people with criminal records. Among the directly impacted leaders were attorneys, policy experts, and the people who coined the very phrase, “Ban the Box.”

An official statement regarding the “Fair Chance Act” legislation and call for an Executive Order is forthcoming. Stay tuned.

Read more about Ban the Box on our page, here.

California Moves Forward On Banning the Box

Members of the Formerly Incarcerated & Convicted People’s Movement have led the fight  to end (or at least slow down) employment discrimination.  California has recently joined the ranks of states that will wait until they have offered before asking “Have you ever been convicted of a felony?”  This new law only applies to state and local governments, but private employers such as Target have voluntarily changed their application procedure after the threat of a lawsuit upon their corporate headquarters in Minnesota.

On July 1st, Los Angeles is poised to become the largest city in America to switch to this more inclusive policy.  “Los Angeles is the city of second chances,” the Mayor Eric Garcetti said. “Somebody might have been arrested for prostitution, they might have been trafficked into it. They might be arrested for drug trade or gotten involved in gangs because they had no parents around. If we’re a city that’s going to be truly compassionate, and most importantly, that’s going to move the entire economy forward, we can’t leave these folks behind.”

Although conducting background checks further along in the process (rather than on the initial application) does not ensure discrimination will not occur, it does force an employer to consider a criminal history in light of the fact that someone is right for the job.  The employer can then decide if their past action is somehow related to the job at hand, and/or recent enough to cause concern.  Furthermore, the prospective employees may explain about how their lives have changed, or the circumstances of what might be simply one tragic or unlucky day.

Those wishing to get more information, or involved with expanding this policy to all employers in the state of California, should contact All of Us or None, Legal Services for Prisoners With Children, or A New Way of Life.

For more, read:

http://losangeles.cbslocal.com/2014/06/06/move-to-delay-background-checks-stirs-controversy/

http://www.latimes.com/local/lanow/la-me-ln-ban-the-box-20140606-story.html

http://webcache.googleusercontent.com/search?q=cache:http://www.postperiodical.com/la-may-ban-felon-question-on-job-applications/%3Futm_source%3Drss%26utm_medium%3Drss%26utm_campaign%3Dla-may-ban-felon-question-on-job-applications